Tuesday, October 20, 2020
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Winter Texan Season approaching, parks will be filled

For the past several months many have been uncertain about how the Corona Virus would impact the 2020-2021 Winter Texan season. Even before the season officially began, we have been noticing many sign of the beginning of a new season.

The Winter Texan Times has been hearing from our readers and followers for several weeks now. We have also been able to talk to many park managers and hear what is going on in their parks and the feedback they have been receiving from their residents.

The outlook for this season is positive.

Despite restrictions, most Winter Texans want to come back to the Valley this winter. We keep hearing ‘I would rather be quarantined in in the Valley where it is warm than in the snow.’

Read more: Winter Texan Season approaching, parks will be filled

The show must go on

ZoomMeetingCaptureTeresa Stoffel, creator of Winter Texan Activities Group on Facebook hosted a meeting Saturday, September 19, with Winter Texan park activity directors, managers, and Wintertainers™. On the agenda were topics of sanitation measures; thinking outside the box for activities and Wintertainers™; what would be needed to implement new types of activities; and to develop a list of Wintertainers™ willing to fill in for those that might feel the need to cancel.

PIVOT was the big word of the meeting. Stoffel said this is a time that Wintertainers™ and activity directors need to pivot their thinking and start thinking outside of the box. Activities should still go on, and can, even though there are restrictions and precautions that need to be taken.

Read more: The show must go on

5 Leadership traits of The Founding Fathers that can unify America

EDITOR’S NOTE: While the Winter Texan Times has no affiliation with the author, we do agree with the content of the following article and feel compelled to share hoping to encourage wise and active participation in our nation’s pollical process. In no way does this represent support for any other opinions or content from this author. As this content is provided for publication in whole the Winter Texan Times has not vetted the content of the linked sites, or publications from this author. Please navigate prudently. “Buyer beware.”

With the COVID-19 pandemic worsening, the economy faltering, and protests against racial injustice continuing, millions of Americans face difficult times and worry about the nation’s future.

And with a presidential election around the corner, it’s a critical time for the country to take stock of what political leadership should mean by going back to the principles embodied by the framers of the Constitution, says Dr. Jim White (www.opportunityinvesting.com), author of THE BROKEN AMERICA: Ten Guiding Principles to Restore America.

Read more: 5 Leadership traits of The Founding Fathers that can unify America

Could You Be Missing Out On Senior Discounts?

Here Are A Few Things To Know

By Chris Orestis

People who reach or near their retirement years often need to watch every penny.

Sure, some of them are financially fit and don’t lose sleep worrying that their bank accounts and investments will run dry.out of money. For many, though, frugality is the watchword as they struggle to make it through each month.

Fortunately, aging does come with at least one financial perk – senior discounts that restaurants, grocery stores, retail stores, airlines, car rental companies, hotels and other businesses offer to their older clientele. These discounts give older Americans a break on prices for everything from a gym membership to a fast-food meal to a movie ticket.

You would think all seniors and their families would be all over these opportunities. But, surprisingly, many people don’t take advantage. In some cases, that could be because it doesn’t occur to ask whether a discount is available. In other cases, people just have a hard time thinking of themselves as seniors.

Read more: Could You Be Missing Out On Senior Discounts?

Use iNaturalist to explore urban wildlife during Earth Week & every week

Smartphone flowersBy Quinta Mazatlan / Center for Urban Ecology / John Brush

Urban wildlife is far more diverse than one might think as we bustle about our daily lives. Yet if we slow down to look at a flower, peer in a tree, or listen to the sounds in our neighborhoods, that perspective shifts. And with iNaturalist, learning what life is around us is easier than ever.

The main feature of iNaturalist, available for free on iOS, Android, and online, is sharing nature observations and getting help identifying what plant or animal we have found. It might be a moth beneath a porch light, or a lizard skittering across a fence, or a tiny flower poking up through a lawn. With iNaturalist, all it takes is quick photo to get started.

Read more: Use iNaturalist to explore urban wildlife during Earth Week & every week

Doctors encourage patients to continue monitoring their health

DHR Health Integrates TeleHealth into Specialty Clinics to Keep Patients Healthy Amid the Pandemic

(April 20, 2020) - Edinburg, TX — While hospitals across the country report a decline in patients admitted for strokes, heart attacks, emergency appendectomies and other urgent health concerns, physicians at DHR Health caution that the decline may be attributed to people’s fears about being admitted to the hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic. With policies and protocols in place to prevent disease spread within the hospital and clinics, doctors are reminding patients to pay close attention to their health and to contact their healthcare provider when experiencing unusual pain or symptoms.

Read more: Doctors encourage patients to continue monitoring their health

Back to basics: Time-tested self-sufficiency practices still relevant

1930sFoodPreservationPic wUsing old-fashioned approaches can promote self-reliance during COVID-19 pandemic

Paul Schattenberg, TAMU

A shortage of some consumer items and shelter-in-place restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic have shown the importance of traditional practices promoting self-reliance and self-sufficiency, said Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service experts.

Read more: Back to basics: Time-tested self-sufficiency practices still relevant

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